Toad World Blog

How to use Toad® for Oracle with Oracle Autonomous Database - 2

Jan 5, 2021 1:45:00 AM by Deepak Vohra

In this second article we delve further into six Quest® Toad ® for Oracle features that could be used to create a table and such.

Oracle Autonomous Database is a self-driving database that requires almost no DBA-initiated management. Automated patching, upgrades and tuning, backups, scaling, and other routine database management tasks while the database is running make the autonomous database self-driving, self-securing, and self-repairing. The autonomous database offers several benefits including high availability, and unmatched performance. The database, recently scoring highest in all Use Cases in a Gartner report, recovers automatically from failure with 99.995% uptime guaranteed. Compute and storage are scaled elastically as needed with no downtime. 

Two versions of the database are available, Autonomous Transaction Processing (ATP) and Autonomous Data Warehouse (ADW). Each of these is designed for a different type of workload. ATP is optimized for online transaction processing (OLTP) with low response time, and application development.  ADW is optimized for complex data analytics over large volumes of data.

Self-driving and all the other autonomous features only refer to the  administration of Oracle Autonomous Database. You still need a client to connect with Oracle Autonomous Database, and Toad for Oracle provides a one-stop integrated development environment  to connect with, and use Oracle Autonomous Database. 

Quest® Toad® for Oracle may be used with either ATP or ADW. This is the second article about this topic.

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In the first article we discussed provisioning an Oracle Autonomous Database instance, downloading and setting up connection credentials, setting environment variables, creating a connection in Toad for Oracle, and exploring the Oracle Autonomous Database in the Database Browser wizard in Toad for Oracle. 

In this second article we delve further into six Toad for Oracle features that could be used to create a table and such in the following sequence:

  • Create a Database Table
  • Use Schema Browser
  • Add Table Data
  • Use Query Builder 
  • Export Dataset
  • Create a Report

Creating a database table

To create an example table called wlslog to store WebLogic server log data, copy the following CREATE TABLE SQL statement to an Editor (SQL Worksheet) associated with an open connection in Toad for Oracle. 

CREATE TABLE wlslog(logid  INT PRIMARY KEY,timestamp VARCHAR(255),category VARCHAR(255),type VARCHAR(255),servername VARCHAR(255),code VARCHAR(255),msg VARCHAR(255));

To format the SQL statement, right-click in the Editor and select Formatting Tools>Format (Figure 1). 

Figure 1. Formatting Tools>Format.

Figure 1. Formatting Tools>Format 

 

The SQL statement gets formatted. To run a SQL statement several options are available. The first option is to select Execute/Compile Statement (Figure 2), which is suitable if only a single statement is to be run.

Figure 2. Execute/Compile Statement.

Figure 2. Execute/Compile Statement

 

Another option is to select Execute via Toad Script Runner (Figure 3), which is suitable if a multi-statement SQL script is to be run.

Figure 3. Execute via Toad Script Runner

Figure 3. Execute via Toad Script Runner

 

The table gets created as indicated by a message in Output in Figure 4.

Figure 4. Output>Table created

Figure 4. Output>Table created

 

The new table wlslog is listed in the Navigator (Figure 5).

Figure 5. Navigator>wlslog

Figure 5. Navigator>wlslog

 

Describing a table

To describe a table, or list the data definition, copy SQL DESC wlslog; in an Editor SQL worksheet, and click on Execute as script (Figure 6).

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Figure 6. Run a script to describe a table

 

The Output tab (Figure 7) lists the table definition.

Figure 7. Table Definition.

Figure 7. Table Definition

 

Using Schema Browser

The Schema Browser wizard is used to browse a schema and database objects in the schema. Schema Browser has several other features that could be used for adding, navigating, and deleting data. To launch the Schema Browser select Database>Schema Browser (Figure 8).

Figure 8. Database>Schema Browser 

Figure 8. Database>Schema Browser 

 

Schema Browser (Figure 9) gets launched. The ADMIN schema that we connected to the WLSLOG table is listed. Click on the WLSLOG.  

Figure 9. Schema Browser

Figure 9. Schema Browser

 

The Columns (Figure 10) tab lists the table columns. Right-click on the columns table and select Size Columns to format the columns. 

Figure 10. Size Columns

Figure 10. Size Columns

 

The formatted columns are shown in Figure 11.

Figure 11. Formatted columns

Figure 11. Formatted columns

 

Schema Browser provides tabs for the different table constructs such as indexes, constraints and synonyms. Select the Constraints tab (Figure 12) to list the constraint columns.

Figure 12. Column Constraints

Figure 12. Column Constraints

Two options are available for adding data; use the Schema Browser, or run a SQL script. Both options are discussed next. 

 

Adding table data from Schema Browser

To add data from the Schema Browser click on Insert record (Figure 13).

Figure 13. Insert record

Figure 13. Insert record

 

A new empty row of data gets added (Figure 14).

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Figure 14. A new empty row of data

 

Add data in the columns. As an example, add the following column demarcated data.   

Apr-8-2014-7:06:20-PM-PDT,Notice,WebLogicServer,AdminServer,BEA-000361,Started WebLogic AdminServer 

Initially the data grid may not be well formatted as shown in Figure 15. Right-click on the data grid and select from one of the options such as Fix Column, Sort Columns, and Reset Columns

FI2D30~1

Figure 15. Data formatting options

 

Formatted data is shown in Figure 16. Further, each column data may be edited using a Popup Editor by double-clicking on a column.

Figure 16. Formatted Data

Figure 16. Formatted Data

 

A Grid Popup Editor (Figure 17) gets displayed. Edit data if needed and click on Post Edit. Other options include navigate data, save data, and Cancel Edit.

Figure 17. Grid Popup Editor

Figure 17. Grid Popup Editor

 

To add another row of data click on Next record (Figure 18). 

Figure 18. Next record

Figure 18. Next record

 

A new empty row of data gets added as shown in Figure 19.

Figure 19. A new empty row of data

Figure 19. A new empty row of data

 

Add a new row of data as shown in Figure 20.

Figure 20. A second row of data

Figure 20. A second row of data

 

A row of data may be deleted with Delete record (Figure 21).

Figure 21. Delete record

Figure 21. Delete record

 

To auto refresh data displayed click in the Auto Refresh checkbox (Figure 22).

Figure 22. Auto Refresh

Figure 22. Auto Refresh

 

In the Auto Refresh Data Grid dialog (Figure 23) specify interval (in seconds) after which data should refresh, and click on OK.

Figure 23. Auto Refresh Data Grid 

Figure 23. Auto Refresh Data Grid 

 

Another feature is to Sort by PK (primary key). Schema Browser provides several other features such as Export dataset (Figure 24).

Figure 24. Export dataset

Figure 24. Export dataset

 

Another feature is to export table DDL as a SQL script with Create Script (Figure 25).

Figure 25. Create Script

Figure 25. Create Script

 

Select the database objects and other Script Options in the Export DDL wizard (Figure 26).

Figure 26. Export DDL Wizard 

Figure 26. Export DDL Wizard 

 

The DDL Script, which includes DROP TABLE, CREATE TABLE , and ALTER TABLE statements,  gets displayed in a window as shown in Figure 27. The Scripts tab in the Schema Browser displays the same script.

Figure 27. SQL Statement

Figure 27. SQL Statement

 

A new table may be created using a graphical user interface (GUI) instead of running SQL statement, for which click on Create Table (Figure 28).

Figure 28. Schema Browser>Create Table

Figure 28. Schema Browser>Create Table

 

The Create Table wizard (Figure 29) gets launched.

Figure 29. Create Table wizard

Figure 29. Create Table wizard

 

Adding data using SQL Editor 

To add data using SQL Editor, copy and paste the SQL to add data to a SQL worksheet, and select one of the options to run SQL, such as Execute/compile statement at caret (Figure 30). 

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Figure 30. Execute/compile statement at caret

 

To display the new data  added in the Schema Browser, auto refresh may be used or Refresh data (Figure 31) may be used.

Figure 31. Refresh data

Figure 31. Refresh data

 

Data added with a SQL statement also gets added to the Data grid as shown in Figure 32.

Figure 32. Refreshed data

Figure 32. Refreshed data

 

Exporting Dataset

To export the dataset, right-click on the data grid and select Export Dataset (Figure 33).

Figure 33. Export Dataset

Figure 33. Export Dataset

 

In the Export Dataset dialog (Figure 34) the default format is Delimited Text, and one of the other formats may also be selected. Specify an output text file and click on OK. 

Figure 34. Export Dataset dialog

Figure 34. Export Dataset dialog

 

The exported data is listed:

TIME_STAMP,CATEGORY,TYPE,SERVERNAME,CODE,MSG

Apr-8-2014-7:06:20-PM-PDT,Notice,WebLogicServer,AdminServer,BEA-000361,Started WebLogic AdminServer

Apr-8-2014-7:06:21-PM-PDT,Notice,WebLogicServer,AdminServer,BEA-000365,Server state changed to RUNNING

Apr-8-2014-7:06:22-PM-PDT,Notice,WebLogicServer,AdminServer,BEA-000360,Server started in RUNNING mode

 

Using the Query Builder

The Query Builder is used to build and run a SQL query. To start the Query Builder wizard click on Query Builder (Figure 35) in the toolbar.

Figure 35. Query Builder

Figure 35. Query Builder

 

The Query Builder gets launched. Query Builder has several features to build different types of queries  including Union Query (Figure 36) and Intersect Query.

Figure 36. Query Builder

Figure 36. Query Builder   

 

First, add database objects from which a query is to be built with Add Objects (Figure 37).

Figure 37. Add Objects

Figure 37. Add Objects

 

In the Add to Query Builder Diagram wizard select the WLSLOG table(Figure 38), and click on OK. 

Figure 38. Add to Query Builder Diagram 

Figure 38. Add to Query Builder Diagram 

 

The table diagram gets added to the Query Builder. Initially the layout may not be well made. Click on Autolayout (Figure 39) to refresh the layout.

Figure 39. Autolayout

Figure 39. Autolayout

 

The table diagram (Figure 40) displays all the columns with no column selected initially.

Figure 40. Table Diagram

Figure 40. Table Diagram

 

Select the checkboxes for the columns to include and the corresponding SQL statement gets listed in Generated Query tab (Figure 41).

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Figure 41. Generated Query

 

Click on Execute Query(Figure 42) to run the query.

Figure 42. Execute Query

Figure 42. Execute Query

 

The query result gets displayed in the Query Result tab (Figure 43).

Figure 43. Query Result

Figure 43. Query Result    

 

The Query Builder provides several features that may be accessed with a right-click on the query result. As an example, to display a single row of data in a window select Single Record Viewer (Figure 44).

Figure 44. Single Record Viewer

Figure 44. Single Record Viewer

A Record View window (Figure 45) for the single record gets displayed.

Figure 45. Record View

Figure 45. Record View

Generating an Excel spreadsheet from  result set  

To generate an Excel spreadsheet, select the result set rows to include, right-click and select Export Dataset (Figure 46).

Figure 46. Export Dataset

Figure 46. Export Dataset

Select Format as Excel File (Figure 47) in the Export Dataset dialog.

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Figure 47. Selecting format as Excel File

 

Select an output file name in Output>File(Figure 48) and click on OK.

Figure 48. Export Dataset>OK

Figure 48. Export Dataset>OK

 

An Excel spreadsheet (Figure 49) gets generated from the result set. 

Figure 49. Excel Spreadsheet

Figure 49. Excel Spreadsheet

 

Creating a report

To generate a report select the result set rows to include, right-click, and select Report (Figure 50).

Figure 50. Result Set>Report

Figure 50. Result Set>Report

 

In the Report Wizard (Figure 51) select the fields to include. Similarly, select groups, and choose the layout and style options. 

Figure 51. Report Wizard

Figure 51. Report Wizard

Add a header and modify other settings as needed. Click on Preview (Figure 52) to preview the report.

Figure 52. Preview

Figure 52. Preview

 

The report Preview (Figure 53) gets displayed. 

Figure 53. Report Preview

Figure 53. Report Preview

 

Ending a connection

To end or close a connection, right-click on the connection and select End Connection (Figure 54).

Figure 54. End Connection

Figure 54. End Connection

 

If any pending transactions exist an option is provided to commit/rollback transactions in a Commit/Rollback dialog(Figure 55).

Figure 55. Commit/Rollback pending transactions

Figure 55. Commit/Rollback pending transactions

 

Stopping Oracle Autonomous Database

To stop and terminate the Oracle Autonomous Database instance, select View Details (Figure 56) in the database console.

Figure 56. View Details

Figure 56. View Details

 

Select Stop (Figure 57) in More Actions. A stopped or running database instance may be terminated by selecting Terminate  in More Actions.

Figure 57. More Actions>Stop

Figure 57. More Actions>Stop

Summary

In two articles we explored how Toad for Oracle is well suited as a client tool and integrated development environment (IDE) for Oracle Autonomous Database. I demonstrated the complete procedure using the Trial version of Toad for Oracle 13, and a later version could be used as well.

 

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Related Toad World posts

Blog: How to use Toad® for Oracle with Oracle Autonomous Database - I

Blog: The Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud Service (ADWC)

Blog: How to Install Oracle Database 18c on Windows

Blog: How to install an Oracle Instant Client for Toad® for Oracle

 

Useful resources

Toad for Oracle general information

Technical brief: Top Five Reasons to Choose Toad Over SQL Developer

Case study: Opening doors and creating opportunities with data insights

 

Have questions, comments?

Head over to the Toad for Oracle forum on Toad World®!  Chat with Toad developers, and lots of experienced users. 

 

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Tags: Toad for Oracle Oracle

Deepak Vohra

Written by Deepak Vohra

Deepak Vohra is an Oracle Certified Associate, Oracle Database 10g, and Sun Certified Java Programmer. Deepak has published on OTN and in Oracle Magazine.